Listening Log: Week 7

Election Day – Sissle & Blake

After reading They All Played Ragtime, I started looking further into the music of Eubie Blake. This song from his groundbreaking collaboration with Noble Sissle, the musical Shuffle Along. It still rings true today, especially in the face of the upcoming election.

Lyrics for “Election Day.”

High Heart – Ben Wendel

Ben Wendel’s latest release High Heart is full of delightful melodies that gradually unfold throughout each piece. The way his saxophone blends with vocalist Michael Mayo to create a unified sound is remarkable.

Tom Sails Away – Charles Ives

This is a difficult song about Charles Ives watching the United States join World War I. The rendition I am familiar with is on Helen Boatwright’s album Songs of Charles Ives and Ernst Bacon.

Listening Log: Week 6

I have deeply missed putting out my weekly Listening Log. October has been an intense month as school and work have ramped up. I also released a new single with Henry Godfrey called Cabin Fever. To make my posts less daunting to write, I decided to trim down my log to three entries rather than five. I’m ready to bring back the Listening Log and look forward to sharing more wonderful music with you.


Ragtime Dance No 1 — Charles Ives

I am fortunate to be taking an incredible class about the music of Charles Ives. I am just beginning to explore his Ragtime Dances and am fascinated by how he honors the aesthetic of the music yet carries it forward in a new direction with rhythm, form, and orchestration.

Sunflower Slow Drag — Scott Joplin & Scott Hayden

This collaboration between two important figures in establishing the classic rag is a delightful piece. I have enjoyed listening to Richard Zimmerman’s solo piano rendition and the New England Conservatory Ragtime Ensemble’s brisker take on the piece.

Charleston Rag — Eubie Blake

Eubie Blake, along with Fats Waller, James P. Johnson, Willie “The Lion” Smith, and Luckey Roberts, pioneered the Eastern take on Ragtime, which evolved into the stride piano style. Preceding his performance of Charleston Rag on the album The Eighty-Six Years of Eubie Blake, he shares that he composed the rag in 1899, the same year that Scott Joplin’s groundbreaking Maple Leaf Rag was published by Stark & Son. Blake also explains how he combined the walking bass line (sometimes referred to as a boogie-woogie bass, but Blake preferred the term walking bass) with ragtime rhythmic ideas.

I was also able to find this incredible live performance of Charleston Rag as played by Blake at the age of 85.

Eubie Blake performs Charleston Rag live in 1972.

What music moved you this week?